All 12 Types of tenses with example, Structure, Uses

The 12 beats with the example, The time indicates both the time of the action and the status.

Directions
current-voltage Past tense Future
  • Not defined
  • Continuous
  • The perfect website
  • Perfectly Continuous
  • Not defined
  • Continuous
  • The perfect website
  • Perfectly Continuous
  • Not defined
  • Continuous
  • The perfect website
  • Perfectly Continuous

12-time types with examples

  1. Current uncertainty
  2. The simple past
  3. A simple future
  4. Really continuously
  5. Past Continuous
  6. A future without interruption
  7. The true ideal.
  8. The past is perfect.
  9. Future Perfect
  10. True Perfect Continuous
  11. Continuous past
  12. Continuous perfect future

(This is a list of 12 counts with an example, see examples below).

Note: The questions are often based on confusing pairs.

Interconnected voltage pairs

  • (simple present tense and continuous present tense)
  • (continuous and uninterrupted)
  • (present perfect tense and simple past tense)
  • (Ordinary past and completed past)

indefinite present tense

We have summarized the following activities under Present indefinitely :

(Routine actions)

  • Regular actions: I come here every day.
  • Irregular actions: The earthquake took place in Japan.
  • Habits: He smokes.
  • Universal truth: The sun rises in the east.

Message: The simple present tense is used in headlines and sports commentaries.

Examples:

  1. The Prime Minister signs the agreement.
  2. Sachin hits the ball and moves out of range.

The simple present tense is used to express what will happen in the near future.

Examples: Pm is leaving for China next week.

Sentencing

(As a sub it is I, we, they, you, or the plural).

  • Positive suggestion: Subject + V1 + Object.
  • Negative sense: Subject + step (not) + V1 + object.
  • Questions:
    Do + Theme + V1 + Object?
    Do + subject + don’t + V1 + subject?
    No + Object + V1 + Object?

If the subject is a he, she, it, name, or singular.

  • Positive suggestion: Subject + V1 s/es + Object.
  • Negative sense: Subject + step (not) + V1 + subject.
  • Questions:
    Is there + subject + V1 + object?
    Is there + subject + no + V1 + object?
    Isn’t that + subject + V1 + object?

Consider the following suggestions

1. What does he know about you? (falsely)

What does he know about you? (period)

2. I don’t know what he knows about you. (period)
3. A request by victims to transfer a riot case to other states does not affect the validity of the case. (Change the to-do, since the main theme is attractiveness).

Explanation of the above sentences.

  • In the context of 1. the question is what is used. Therefore, a survey form should be used afterward.
  • In the second sentence, what connects the two sentences. So it must be followed by a normal sentence, which is.
  • The verb should always be consistent with the main subject of the sentence. We often associate the verb with the next object, but this is not true. (Time types with an example)

Single fits voltage as per example

(An action that is completed is expressed in the simple past tense).

Examples: I saw you, but you didn’t see me.

Sentencing

  • Positive suggestion: Theme + V2 + Object
  • Negative sense: Object + Do not (did not) + V1 + Object
  • Questions:
    Fact + Subject + V1 + Object?
    Fact + Subject + V1 + Object?
    Isn’t it + object + V1 + object?

Message: If the sentence begins with the time, the time has come, or the time has come and is followed by a subject, then the verb that follows the subject has the second form (V2).

Examples:

  • It’s time for you to learn. (falsetto)
  • It’s time to learn. (right)

If It’s time is followed by to, V1 is used.

Examples: It’s time to learn.

Normally the verbs do and did are not used as auxiliary verbs in a positive sentence. But to underline the main verb, we use do – done and done – done before the main verb. In these sentences, the main verb must have the form V1.

  1. They come here every day. (period)
  2. He made a mistake. (right)

If the sentence is in the past tense, it is in the past tense.

Examples:

  1. I came yesterday. (wrongly)
  2. I came yesterday. (period)

Single future voltage

The action, which should take place in the future, is taking place as part of Simple Future Tension.

Examples: I’ll see you tomorrow.

Sentencing

  • Positive suggestion: Sub + Lens / V1 + Object
  • Negative sense: Sub + must/should not + V1 + object
  • Questions:
    Should/would + implied + V1 + object?
    Should/Would + Under + Step + V1 + Object?
    Can’t/won’t + sub + V1 + obj?

Message: The use should/should not be explained in the terms and conditions.

DC current voltage

(The action that takes place during the speech is in this Continue Tension).

Examples: I’m learning English right now.

Sometimes certain events happen as we speak, but we cannot see them, they happen with (types of voltage for example) direct voltage of the present.

Examples:

  1. Coastal areas are flooded.
  2. The population is growing day by day.

Message: Current duration is used for events that will occur in the near future.

Examples: I fly to Mumbai tomorrow.

Sentencing

  • Positive suggestion: Sub + is/time/distance + V1 + ing + object
  • Negative sense:
    Sub + is/time is not + V1 + ing + object
    Sub + is/time is not + V1 + ing + object
  • Questions:
    Is/is/is + sub + not + V1 + ing + obj?
    Is/is/is + sub + not + V1 + ing + obj?
    Is/is + sub + not + V1 + ing + obj?

I don’t have a contact form. Therefore, the question mark is not used.

Examples: I’m okay, right?

Use is/are

  • It is: he / she / name / singular
  • Am: It’s me.
  • Look at this: With you/us, everyone, the ten years, plural….

Message:

  • My father works in a bank and my brother goes to school. (wrongly)
  • My father works in a bank and my brother goes to school. (period)

If the declaration relates to a routine operation, the single current time is used instead of the continuous current time. However, if it is only a temporary steering action, the current DC voltage is used.

Examples: I’m preparing for the exams now.

Beyond DC voltage

If the action took place in the past, the simple past tense is used.

Examples: I’ve been waiting for you.

Sentencing

  • Positive suggestion: Sub + war/ist + V1 + ing + obj
  • Negative sense:
    Sub + was/is not + V1 + ing + object
    Sub + was/is not + V1 + ing + object
  • Questions: What is it? + sub + V1 + ing + obj?
    Was/is + sub + not + V1 + ing + obj?
    No/No + Sub + V1 + ing + obj?

The use of was and is

  • What – he/she/it name/individual numbers
  • Were you/us/he/anything.

An imaginary sentence was used with all subjects, regardless of whether it was used as an auxiliary or main verb.

Examples:

  1. I would love to be a bird (main verb).
  2. He pretended to be asleep (helps the verb).

Future DC voltage

(The action that takes place in the future takes place as part of the Future Continuous Tension).

Examples: We take the exam on that date next month.

Sentencing

  • Positive suggestion: article + must/should + will + V1 + ing + article
  • Negative sense:
    Subject + must/should not + be + V1 + ing + object
    Subject + must/should not + V1 + ing + object
  • Questions:
    V1 + ing + obj
    Want/need + subject + being + V1 + ing + obj
    Want/do not + subject + being + V1 + ing + obj

Message: Some verbs do not take the ing form. Therefore, they cannot be under direct tension.

A list of these verbs:

1. Verbs of observation: Seeing, tasting, smelling, them, choosing, noticing, recognizing.
2. verb: Thinking, you know, creeping around, thinking, remembering, assuming.
3. Verbal indicating possession Possess, have, belong, consist of, have, contain, consist of.
4. Verb expressing a feeling or a state of mind Faith as aversion, love, adoration, desire, longing, hatred, approval, trust, imagination.
5. Common verbs: See, appear, act, recover, stand, demand, become, hope, refuse.

Examples:

  • He needs a car.
    He has a car. (on the right)
  • I own this house.
    This house is mine (on the right side).
  • No offense.
    No offense. (on the right)
  • I see a man in there.
    I see a man standing there. (on the right)

Message: When you must have the means to possess, you do not use it in the form of acquisition, but when you must have the means to entertain or eat, you use acquisition in the form of acquisition.

Examples:

  • I’m going to have a piece of cake. (right)
    I have a car. (wrong)
  • I have a car. (right)

When thinking, remembering, feeling, looking, appearing, etc. are used to express an emotion, or when the above verbs are used in the progressive state, they can be in the ing form. (Time types with an example)

Examples:

  • I think you’re right.
    I think you’re right. (right)
  • I’m thinking of you.
    Looks like they want to kill us.
    It looked like they were trying to kill us. (right)
  • They look good. (on the right)
  • Look! He can smell the roses. (on the right)

Present participles and gerunds use verbs in the Ingrid form.

Examples:

  1. Because I was sick, I couldn’t come.
  2. It’s easy to find a job these days.
  3. Seeing is believing.
  4. Swimming is good exercise.

When we use a verb after a preposition, the verb will have the forming.

Examples:

  1. Bats can hear ultrasonic waves (V1 ing).
  2. We must abstain from smoking (Q1 ing).

Perfect Weather

An action that has just been completed is expressed in the present tense.

Examples: He came to Delhi recently.

When the action is important, and not the moment of the action, and the moment of the action is unspecified, we use the present Perfect Tension.

Examples:

  1. We’ve accomplished a lot.
  2. We’ve reached the moon.

Ordering formula

  • Positive suggestion: Object + is/are + V3 Object
  • Negative sense:
    Subject + a/not a subject + direct object Q3
    Subject + a/not a subject + direct object Q3
  • Questions:
    Had/had + subject + V3 + object?
    Dressing/conducting + subject + none + V3 + object?
    Is it / is it not + subject + Q3 + direct object?

Use cap/box

  • Has-been: He/she/it/their name/ loneliness
  • С… с : Me, us, you, lots, everything.

See the difference:

  1. Science has brought us many new inventions. (period)
  2. We have reached the moon. (period)
  3. Science gave us the 19th century. The 20th century brought many new inventions. (wrongly)
  4. We have the moon on the 22nd. October 2008 reached. (incorrect)

When the past is given, use the simple past tense instead of the perfect present tense.

The appropriate suggestions will be:

  1. Science has taken us to the 19th century. In the 20th century, many medicines saved lives. (period)
  2. We have the moon on the 22nd. October reached (right).

Message: In a sentence, any form of the word had can be accompanied by the word had (here had will be the main verb). That’s because Perfect Voltage uses combinations like this.

  1. I’m in enough trouble as it is.
  2. He had breakfast. (period)

Normal, recent, all, while being used in perfect weather. However, it is usually used in True Perfection negative sentences.

Examples:

  1. He hasn’t gone home yet (true perfection).
  2. So far, he hasn’t done anything. (past perfect)

If the since is followed by the simple past tense, then the since is preceded by the past present tense.

Examples: I haven’t seen him since he left India.

Message: In these sentences, the past tense of a modal sentence can also be used.

Examples: Maybe he’s gotten older since the last time she saw him,

When t.c. is used at the beginning of a sentence, the sentence is formed as follows.

Examples: He hasn’t taken a day off since he was in the army.

Time spent perfectly

Take a look at the suggestions below:

  • I saw him before he stopped the car. I saw him before he stopped the car. (period)
  • Before he realized it, the burglar had escaped.
    Before he realized it, the burglar had escaped. (period)
  • I met him after I finished work.
    I met him after I finished work. (period)
  • When I arrived at the theatre, the performance had already started (error)
    When I arrived at the theatre, the performance had already started. (period)
  • When Anand arrived in his village, he discovered that the news about him had preceded him. (period)

If in the past two acts occur in succession, the first act is the first act. Action in the past perfect tense and the 2. Simple past tense action (tense with example).

Sentencing

  • Positive suggestion: Subject + had + V3 + object
  • Negative sense: Object + had + had not + V3 + object
  • Questions:
    Had + subject + V3 + object
    Had + subject + step + V3 + object
    Had + subject + V3 + object

Message: See the fifth sentence.

When Anand arrived in his village, he discovered that the news about him had preceded him.

Explanation: Arriving early means arriving early. One. Action is the coming news, which should be in the Past Perfect Tension and the 2nd. The action takes place in the village, which must be in the simple past tense.

Future perfect voltage with example

(Definition: an action that will be done in the future refers to the perfect future tense).

Examples: You will have completed your program by the end of next month.

Look at the following sentences:

Examples:

  1. By the time I got to the station, the train had already left.
  2. So far, simple present, future completed.

Sentencing

  • Positive suggestion: Subject + will/must + is + V3 + direct object
  • Negative sense:
    Subject + will/shall not + have + V3 + obj
    Subject + will/shall not + have + V3 + obj
  • Questions:
    Is + under + is + V3 + object?
    Will she/he have + under + will not have + V3 + object?
    Not/will not be + under + V3 + object?

Look at the difference:

  1. By the time I got to the station, the train had already left.
  2. When I arrived at the station, the train had already left.

Perfect DC voltage

(The action, which has already begun and is still continuing, is called Current Perfect Uninterrupted Tension.

Examples: I have been living in Delhi for five years now.

Sentencing

  • Positive suggestion: Sub + has/had + was + V1 + ing + object + per/occurring + time.
  • Negative sense:
    Sub + is/is + no + was + V1 + ing + object + pro/con + time.
    Sub + no/no + V1 + ing + obj + for/since + time.
  • Questions:
    Was/is + sub + was + V1 + ing + obj + for/as + time?
    Was/what + sub + was not + V1 + ing + obj + before/ since + time?
    Is/is + sub + was + V1 + ing + obj + for/since + time ?

Examples:

  1. I’ve been teaching you since the first class. (falsely)
  2. I’ve been teaching you for an hour. (right)

Used for a certain period of time.

Examples:

1. For two hours, for the last two years.
2. For five years, in the last two months.
3. Ten years, the last three weeks.

C: used over a period of time.

Examples:

1. Since Monday, from the beginning.
3. Since 2008, since forever.
4. Since 7:00 last year.

Example of time

Imperfect DC voltage according to example

(An activity that began in the past, continued in the past, and ended in the past falls under the past tense category).

Examples: I’ve been waiting for you since this morning.

Ordering formula

  • Positive suggestion: Sub + was + V1 + ing + object + over/under + time.
  • Negative sense: Sub + was + was not + V1 + ing + obj + before/ since + time.
  • Questions:
    Had + sub + was not + V1 + ing + obj + before/ since + time?
    Was + under + was not + V1 + ing + object + over/under + time?
    Was not + under + was + V1 + ing + obj + before/ since + time?

Future perfect continuous voltage

An action that continues until a future moment falls under the definition of perfect continuity of the future.

Examples: By the end of this year, I will have lived in Delhi for five years.

Sentencing

  • Positive suggestion: Sub + will/won + were + V1 + ing + obj + for/of + time.
  • Negative sense:
    Sub + will/won’t + were + V1 + ing + object + for/of + time.
    Sub + can’t/won’t + were + V1 + ing + obj + for/of + time.
  • Questions:Doel/Wil + below + no + were + V1 + ing + object + for/ab + time
    Doel/Wil l + below + no + were + V1 + ing + object + for/ab + time

Message: Verbs not used in the ing form are not used in the continuous/continuous form.

These verbs should not be used in the continuous, but in the indefinite tense.

For example:

I know you.
I know you.

These verbs should be used in the perfect tense and not in the perfect continuum.

For example:
I’ve known him for five years.
I’ve known him for five years. (right)

To/from is used in ideal DC voltage.

Examples:

  1. I have been living in Delhi for the past five years.
  2. I’ve known him for two years. (right)

When the expression for/of + time is used in a sentence, it is in perfect time or perfect continuous time.

Examples:
I haven’t eaten since this morning.
I haven’t eaten since this morning. That’s right.

The direction of species PDF

Types of time

Time Types PDF Download (76 downloads)

frequently asked questions

What is the structure of all voltages?

As you may have noticed, all transitions use the present tense of the verb be and the participle, while all perfections use the past tense of the verb have and the participle.

How much sample time is there?

In English, there are three main forms of verbs: The present, the past, and the future. The present, past, and future are divided into four aspects: simple, progressive, perfect, and perfect progressive. There are 12 basic verb tenses that English learners should know.

What are the times for the examples?

The verb tense | What is the verb tense? – The grammar monster

 

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